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Approximately 600,000 groin and 90,000 incisional hernia repair operations are performed annually in the United States. Many are performed by the conventional “open” method. The surgeons at CHRIAS typically perform hernia procedures using minimally invasive techniques.



A hernia occurs when the inside layers of the abdominal muscle have weakened, resulting in a bulge or tear. In the same way that an inner tube pushes through a damaged tire, the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area of the abdominal wall to form a small balloon-like sac. This can allow a loop of intestine or abdominal tissue to push into the sac. The hernia can cause severe pain and other potentially serious problems that could require emergency surgery.

Keep in mind that:
  • Both men and women can get a hernia.
  • You may be born with a hernia (congenital) or develop one over time.
  • A hernia does not get better over time, nor will it go away by itself.

Laparoscopic Hernia Repair is a technique to fix tears in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). If may offer a quicker return to work and normal activities with a decreased pain for some patients.

Only after a thorough examination can your surgeon determine whether laparoscopic hernia repair is right for you. The procedure may not be best for some patients who have had previous abdominal surgery or underlying medical conditions.



When a ventral hernia occurs, it usually arises in the abdominal wall where a previous surgical incision was made. In this area the abdominal muscles have weakened; this results in a bulge or a tear. In the same way that an inner tube pushes through a damaged tire, the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area of the abdominal wall to form a balloon-like sac. This can allow a loop of intestines or other abdominal contents to push into the sac. If the abdominal contents get stuck within the sac, they can become trapped or “incarcerated.” This could lead to potentially serious problems that might require emergency surgery. Other sites that ventral hernias can develop are the belly button (umbilicus) or any other area of the abdominal wall.

The CHRIAS team typically performs incisional or ventral hernia repair using minimally invasive techniques. Talk to your surgeon to determine whether laparoscopic hernia repair is right for you.